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Terms

Floodplain - a nearly flat plain along the course of a stream or river that is naturally subject to flooding.

Impervious Surface - a hardened surface (e.g. concrete, rooftop, asphalt, compacted gravel, etc.) that does not absorb stormwater.

Natural Hydrologic System - the natural sequence through which water passes into the atmosphere as water vapor, precipitates to earth in liquid or solid form, and ultimately returns to the atmosphere through evaporation.

Watershed - a region or area bounded peripherally by a divide and draining ultimately to a particular watercourse or body of water.

Diagram showing Normal Conditions and Flood Conditions in a floodplain.

Floodplain Management

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Land Development Can Lead to Flooding

When land is developed, the natural sequence in which water passes from the earth to the atmosphere and back again is altered. Surfaces that don’t absorb water such as rooftops, driveways, streets and parking lots prevent rainwater from soaking into the ground, which increases stormwater runoff and can lead to flooding and erosion. Drainage systems that handle the runoff such as gutters, storm sewers and lined channels can make flooding and erosion worse.

Building and filling in the areas around rivers and streams that are naturally subject to flooding (the floodplain) intensifies flooding and erosion. In areas where water drains off, rapid development can cause properties and structures previously unaffected by flooding to become vulnerable.

Managing the Floodplain

Floodplain management involves identifying flood-prone areas and managing how that area is used. An effective management plan minimizes alterations to floodplains and streambeds, which in turn reduces flooding and protects floodplain benefits such as enhanced water quality.

The City of Peachtree Corners minimizes potential flooding from future growth by addressing the impact of new development and redevelopment on stormwater. Floodplain regulations and development restrictions can greatly reduce future flooding impacts, preserve greenspace and habitat, control floodwaters, and protect water quality.

Helpful Links

Image of land being developed at the Peachtree Corners Town Center.